The Punishment (Short Stories For When Your Alone Book 1)

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By there same token, there are certain things that are expected of a girl to maintain her societal femininity. From a young age, we are lead to believe that boys are the dominant, more powerful sex. Females are portrayed as care takers and are often seen as being more compassionate and caring then males are. Men are expected to rougher and less sensitive. The men are expected to work hard to bring home money to support their families. Females are often portrayed as being more in touch with their emotions. None of these ideas applies to any one person any more so then do personality traits, but our society interpellates these ideas into our minds every minute of every day.

The following passage is from my paper on the Goonies , in which I highlight some examples of the interpellation typical female and male roles in this movie. The boys seem to be portrayed in the usual ways, as being mischievous and thrill seeking, while the girls are shown as weak and scared. The oldest girl, Andy, seems more concerned with her crush throughout the movie then she does with finding the gold and taking an active role in the adventure.

There is a point in the movie where Mikey tells Andy that she may want to hold his hand because it was dark up ahead and it may be dangerous. This is another example of the girls and the guys being put into common roles that society has created for them. As we have been told since we were young children through fairy tales and everyday life, men are supposed to take care of females and be there to protect them. This statement reaffirms the idea of interpellation of typical male and female roles in this film.

The developers son is driving a convertible and wearing his letter jacket and has two girls in his car, while Brent is wearing ratty old sweats and is riding his little brothers bike. Interpellation is shown in the idea that the rich kids are cool and popular, while the poor kids are unpopular and outcasts.

At the end of the movie, when the family realizes they have enough money to save their home, they come together and hug each other and really show affection towards each other for the first time in the movie. Again, interpellation is shown in that money and material things bring happiness. Children who are born into wealth and privilege are showcased in reality television and documentaries, further rubbing our noses in the fact that there are parents who can provide for their children in ways that you or I could never imagine from a material standpoint.

Our culture seems to go out of its way to display this quality, to make those who have more feel better about themselves and those who have less feel worse. I think this reoccurring theme is strong in the Goonies. As described in the excerpt Mikeys family is portrayed as poor and unhappy. The rich family holds the happiness of the poor family in its hands. The rich family has all of the agency while the poor family has none.

Like in our society, the poor are at the mercy of the rich. They want to keep power in the hands of those who have always had it, and usually on of the only ways to do that is to interpellate society to believe that that is where the power and authority belong in the first place. In fact, I always hated princesses and pink for that matter. Below are some detailed examples of interpellation that I found in this particular version of the story:. He is stopped along the way by a strange old man. The picture of the old man in this story is interesting because the old man is dressed rather uniquely.

I think that this shows interpellation because it shows that strange people dress differently from normal people. In the United States , we assert ourselves and are identity at first impression, based solely on our clothing. Like I said in the paper, distinctions between strange and normal are made all of the time based on clothing. If I were to dread lock my hair, someone might look at me and think I was perhaps dirty or unprofessional, when my goal is doing so was only to embrace a low maintenance lifestyle.

We make assumptions like the previous constantly, based on appearance alone. We are interpellated to believe that we must dress certain ways for certain occasions. After Jack climbs the beanstalk, he finds the giants wife, who just returned from picking flowers.

He asks her for something to eat and she says that she will make him something to eat, but that they must be fast because her husband gets home soon. She is patiently waiting for her husband to get home and is picking flowers to pass the time and she is the one who does all of the cooking for her husband. The wife also seems to be at the mercy of her husband. In the story she invites Jack inside but warns him that her husband likes to eat little boys. Interpellation is shown in the idea that the giant has the control over his wife and her opinion on the welfare of Jack is irrelevant to him.

As soon as the giant gets home, he demands dinner and his wife, who has already had it prepared, brings it to him right away. The female giant seems to act like a servant to her husband; throughout the story he demands things and she brings them for him right away. It is also interesting that the husband is only concerned with eating, sleeping and money, which is a very typical depiction of males. Kingdom Hearts as a Child-Centered Text. In the Playstation 2 game Kingdom Hearts , players are introduced to a young boy named Sora who is thrown into a struggle to save not one, but multiple worlds from a mysterious force known as the Heartless.

Sora finds himself suddenly wielding a magical weapon called the Keyblade , which just happens to be the only thing that can fight the Heartless, and an artifact that Donald Duck and Goofy have been ordered by Mickey Mouse to find. Sora has a different mission- he is looking for his two best friends, Riku and Kairi , who disappeared when his world was destroyed by the Heartless.

Together, Sora , Donald and Goofy venture to different worlds, meet many other Disney characters, and battle the Heartless in hopes of restoring balance to the worlds. At first, Kingdom Hearts appears to be a light fairy-tale about good fighting evil, but it soon becomes apparent that Sora and childlike characters like Donald and Goofy are dealing with issues not typically found in adult-centered texts, and more importantly, they are doing it without the aid of just, authoritative adults. The adults in Kingdom Hearts are a far cry from the knowledgeable, caring, strong individuals typically found in adult-centered texts.

The first major group of adults consists of the villains from various Disney movies who are working together with the Heartless to take over their worlds. This group includes such characters as Jafar , Captain Hook and Maleficent, all of which are most likely already infamous to the player for their deeds in their respective films.

The game presents them as completely irredeemable- they are evil, corrupt, and will stop at nothing to achieve their goals, even if it means dealing with the mysterious Heartless. Of course, one by one their plans backfire and they are either defeated by Sora or betrayed by the Heartless, which is a rather adult-centered way of dealing with bad adults. However, the second major group of adults makes up for this. These characters are the heroes that the villains originally battled- Aladdin, Tarzan and Jack Skellington , for example.

Upon arriving in Halloween Town , for example, Sora , Donald and Goofy are shocked to see that Jack has recruited the Heartless in the annual Halloween festival. In addition to these two groups of adults, Kingdom Hearts features adults that appear to be in positions of authority, but in reality have little or no power over children. In the world of The Little Mermaid , King Triton has lost much of his control over Ariel- the scene where he originally destroys all of her treasures becomes much less devastating in the game, where he only destroys an item that is later revealed to be useless anyway.

His mother is heard once at the beginning of the game, where she calls him for dinner, but the same exact scene shows Sora sneaking out of the house through his bedroom window. Mickey Mouse is the closest thing to a central authority figure the game has because he is the main reason why Donald and Goofy are exploring the worlds, and thus, the reason why Sora is brought along. However, it is interesting to note that Mickey is more of a childlike character than an adult, due to his being an animal. In addition to Mickey Mouse, Donald and Goofy are also very childlike.

Donald still has a short temper and is very annoyed at the idea of the legendary Keyblade Master being a kid. He and Sora do not get along very well, but their arguments are small and childish, and they usually make amends shortly after. Goofy tries hard to be the mediator between the two, but he usually ends up doing what Donald tells him to avoid causing more trouble. However, Goofy soon realizes that Sora is too good a friend to just abandon and has a change of heart. Sora himself also has a huge amount of agency, possibly more than anyone else in the game. His agency is represented by the Keyblade , which is regarded as a symbol of great power in every world he visits.

When he loses it, he can only get it back by realizing that its strength comes from his heart. Sora receives the Keyblade by resisting the Heartless when his world is destroyed- it recognizes that he is strong and good-hearted. When he learns of his destiny as the Keyblade Master, he embraces it rather than running from such a huge responsibility, if only because he hopes that it will lead him to his missing friends. However, he realizes that he is being used to hurt his friends and fights back.

In an attempt to atone for the things he did while working for the villains, Riku offers to help Sora seal off the Heartless, but this act will leave him trapped with the Heartless as a result. Sora is distressed at the thought of being separated again, but Riku insists, and his confidence in Sora allows them to seal away the Heartless. Kingdom Hearts still has some elements common to adult-centered texts, one of which is the mostly conservative plot.

Sora is trying to restore the norm instead of change it, and the forces trying to cause change and disrupt the balance are the Heartless and the Disney villains. Sora also learns lessons throughout the game by interacting with the various characters within the Disney worlds. The lessons are highly didactic and Sora ultimately accepts them, but at the end of the game, it is clear to the player that he is still given the choice of acknowledging them or not.

Finally, there is the question of what the Heartless truly represent. There is no doubt that the Heartless are pure evil- they corrupt everything they touch and bring out the very worst in anyone who deals with them. Then again, the Heartless could also represent a more child-centered view- that children have the ability to resist evil. Sora wields the Keyblade , which is the only weapon that can truly stop the Heartless, and he gains it by resisting the darkness.

Meanwhile, Riku , who is a few years older than Sora and therefore less childlike, willingly joins the Heartless. Also, the adults who indulge in the evil perpetrated by the Heartless end up being defeated, or worse, completely swallowed by the darkness. However, the game makes it clear that it is not childlike innocence that allows Sora , Donald and Goofy to effectively fight the Heartless- as a child-centered theme, the Heartless represent a false sense of maturity and power that can only be overcome by a strong sense of right and wrong, friendship, and courageousness, which the trio have gained by working together.

Riku also realizes this after being used by the Heartless, and therefore he also gains the ability to fight them. While Kingdom Hearts features didactic lessons and a conservative storyline, the focus of the game lies with the childlike characters. Sora has only enlisted himself in the fight against the Heartless because he hopes it will lead him to his friends. The Disney characters he meets throughout his journey act more childlike than he does, and even Mickey Mouse, the central authority figure of the game, is childlike. While there are some adult-centric ideas present in Kingdom Hearts , the game is mostly a child-centered text because the children and childlike characters act with a great amount of agency and deal with things that are typically not associated with common assumptions about childhood, while adult figures are either powerless, bad, or flawed and complicated themselves.

The simple story relates an incident of a flood that enables Princess Molly the Messy, a member of a tidy and neat royal family, to rescue her them through her messiness, and ultimately shows the value of her individuality. The main area where Tyler strays from classic patterns involves the message of the story. In fact, Tyler even suggests that messiness may not only come in handy, but it could also be a means of rescue.

Thus, Molly never disobeys her parents because a specific request, which she could obey, is never present. In essence, Tyler portrays Molly as innocent and kindhearted, sharing her space and using all she has for good, even though her disorderly ways would typically be naughty behavior. Tyler spins a web of opposites, showing innocence in a slovenly room. Clearly, a messy room relates almost universally to all children who might enjoy a tale about this quality.

However, Tyler treats messiness much differently than many parents would by showing its benefits, not its repulsiveness. Most children posses messiness seemingly inherently and would revel in a book about their way of life. Tyler provides a character to identify with, no matter who the young reader is.

Tumble Tower represents an interesting blend of standard formats and counter-culture messages. Though the story is didactic, its message teaches the individuality of personality in children. Even though the movie is one of the most popular Disney films it shows some underlying examples of interpellation.

There are also some issues of agency that display the intricate way that Mary Poppins changes the degree of agency in the household. When watching the film and trying to figure out who has agency over whom it seemed difficult because of the fact that there are several characters that are involved.

When the film begins everything seems to be typical when it comes to agency. Banks is the man of the house and tells everyone what to do and everyone in return obeys him. The first song Mr. Banks sings is about how proud he was of how orderly his life was. He felt that it was his duty to give commands and do everything in the exact order that they were supposed to be done in a stereotypical sense. It seemed that all was in order and that order was given by Mr. Banks alone. The minute that Mary Poppins comes into their door the agency is taken away from Mr.

Banks immediately. Even though he has no idea that he no longer has power because of the fact that Mary Poppins is wise enough to know that if she lets him think that he tells her what to do and that he comes up with all of the ideas then he will never know. This does create a slight fight for power between Mr.

Banks and Mary Poppins because Mary always has to stay one step ahead of Mr. Banks and he is always a very close step behind her. When the dynamics of the household become so happy and seemingly perfect Mr. Banks is angry because he can almost feel himself losing his power which is what causes him to become so bossy. When things involve Jane and Michael they are not directly given any agency but seems to be able to take some of the agency away in certain circumstances.

Anytime they seemed to disobey an adult it was either a misunderstanding or they were quickly turned around. The only obvious time that agency was displayed by the children was when Michael was at the bank and he was adamant that his money go to feeding the birds instead of in the bank. When Mary, Bert and the children jumped into the picture they were able to go out on their own for awhile without supervision but that would be the person with the agency allowing them to have a little leeway. Mary gave them chances to be their own judge but she was always there to pull them back and take over when things were out of hand.

She allowed agency to be taken when there was a lesson to be taught in letting them go. After Mary has accomplished what she came to do, which would be to show the family how to be a family and how to have fun and take the time they have and cherish it, she allowed the agency to be taken back by Mr. It was very interesting to see how manipulative Mary could be when dealing with people and getting her way; it was apparent that she was an expert at stealing agency from others.

This film drips with interpellation even though it is not always obvious. The first example that comes up is the fact that Mr. Banks has the final say in everything and that is played out as if it should be that way. I found it ironic that the spunk Mrs. Banks had when Mr. Banks was not around was astounding but that changed as soon as he enters the picture.

Banks is home she is extremely submissive. For example when she is leaving the house to go to a protest Mr. Though there may be some sarcasm meant by the writers of the film it still says to society that it is okay to have your own opinions as a women but when it comes to her husband she better be obedient and believe what he says.

Banks opinions are totally contradictory to things that Mr. Banks says but when she talks to him she agrees with everything he says. Her description is rosy cheeks, never cross or cheery disposition, she is thin, and this is what most would consider very ladylike as well; this all points to what women are continuously told to be. When Mary, Bert and the children are in the painting and they get on Merry-go-round horses Mary rode the lavender one with a smug ladylike look on its face, Jane rode the pink one with long eyelashes, Michael rode the blue one with slit eyes and Bert rode the orange one.

Even though this was a small detail of the movie it still displays what girls and boys should be like and what colors they should wear. When the children went to the bank with their father the whole trip was centered on Michael, even though Jane went along he was the one that was supposed to invest his money and see what his dad does.

The thought of Jane investing her money in the bank was never even thought of or even the idea that she had any money. Men are supposed to take care of all the money and be the ones that earn it and that is what the whole bank trip reinforced. Michael always seems to be the one taking the action, in the end when they go fly a kite Michael is the one flying it with his father and Jane and Mrs.

Banks are in the background watching. The film interpellates us to think that the men are supposed to be the ones acting on their feelings and saving people and even thinking. The only dominant role that a women plays in the film are the cook, maid and nanny; Mary Poppins is a controversial character because of her ability to do as she pleases even around men but she still plays right into the stereotype that the male should be in the dominant seat.

The film does seem to have a hint of sarcasm about the role of the women as stated earlier but in the end it seems to be just a bit of humor that does not disprove the interpellation. Things seem to all fall into the stereotypical place that society likes for them to be in both in terms of agency and interpellation. It seems as if in this case interpellation coincides with agency which seems to put the happy ending to the movie. The movie is about a colony of ants that spends most of its time gathering grain for the grasshoppers, who intimidate and frighten them into doing it.

It leaves the ants little time to gather food for themselves before the rainy season begins, but it is a part of their culture, and so they continue to repeat the tradition year after year. In the beginning of the movie, the ants are preparing their yearly offering when it is ruined by Flik , an ant in the colony. The grasshoppers are very angry and demand that they gather twice the amount of food before the last leaf falls. He finds what he thinks are warrior bugs, but are actually circus bugs, who in turn think that Flik is a talent scout.

They travel back with him to the colony, impress everyone, and then discover their real purpose for being there. They end up staying however, and the ants come up with a plan to keep away the grasshoppers—they make a bird to scare them. They all work together, but in the end their plan is foiled. Flik , however, stands up for the colony, the grasshoppers are scared away, and the head grasshopper, Hopper, gets eaten by a bird.

In the end the ants no longer have to gather food for the grasshoppers—only themselves. The first character I wanted to talk about that demonstrates resistance of interpellation is Flik. The main problem is that through trying to make things better for the colony, he brings in new ideas that the colony is not willing to accept.

You wanna help us build this thing, then get rid of that machine, get back in line, and pick grain like everyone else! He is almost repressively interpellated , in that the other ants try to force him to act like everyone else. An example of this is while the ants are in line to deposit their grains onto the pile; a leaf falls on the path of the line, and the ant it falls in front of freaks out.

When that is impossible, they flip out. Flik resists interpellation, which also provides him with agency. There are several examples of this throughout the movie, one of which is the way that he stands up to Hopper. In this way, Flik gains agency because he acts on behalf of himself and admits that he resisted interpellation purposefully. Another example of Flik gaining agency is when he left the colony.

The colony did not like that someone tried to be different than what was expected of them, and were willing to punish Flik because of it—another example of how their interpellation is repressive. Flik , however, decides to go off on his own to try again to help his colony. He acts as a free agent in that sense—it was his idea to leave, although he did have to get permission. Another resister of interpellation is the ladybug. He usually gets pretty angry when this happens, and tries to inform the other bugs that he is a male and being a ladybug does not necessarily make him a lady.

In the end, however, he becomes more feminine, due to his affiliation with the Blueberries. In contrast is Heimlich, the caterpillar who desperately wants to fit in with his species by growing wings and becoming a butterfly. However, he is incredibly happy because as a caterpillar, he wanted so badly to go through the same transformation that other caterpillars go through—due to ideological interpellation. In this way, Heimlich is a foil for the ladybug—they represent opposing desires and goals.

Additionally, Dot is a marked contrast to her sister, Atta. Dot is very rebellious and attempts to gain agency in a few ways, the first of which is trying to use her wings to fly before they were fully grown. However, her desire to fly could also be attributed to interpellation—she wants to be able to do what everyone else is able to. But Dot also demonstrates agency by leading the Blueberries into hiding from the grasshoppers when they come to collect their grain at the end of the season.

She goes on her own to find Flik to bring him back and help the rest of the colony—and this time she is able to fly. Her ability to fly and the complete growth of her wings can be interpreted as a symbol of her independence and power. When she finds Flik , she gives him a rock to represent a seed to remind him of what he told her in the beginning of the movie: she may be just a small seed, but she will one day grow into a big, strong tree and be able to do anything.

So Dot, the little girl, teaches Flik , the young man, a lesson, which helps her to gain agency. Atta is ideologically interpellated to believe that she must be infallible in order to govern the colony. She seems very rule-oriented and unable to function unless she knows what it is she is expected to do. She seems to be unable to simply observe a situation and come up with an answer—she has to know what was done in the past, what her mother did, etc. However, by the end of the movie, Atta gains agency, in that she is crowned as Queen by her mother, who apparently decides that she is ready.

Atta also resists interpellation—she saves Flik by grabbing him and flying off with him. He tells her to fly away from the ant hill while it is raining which is very dangerous for the ants , and she responds that the ant hill is the other way. Some of the characters in the movie resisted interpellation in a healthy way, and some were interpellated in a healthy way, but some were also interpellated in an unhealthy way. Meta-textual sources call attention to themselves as a created thing by being self-referential, breaking the fourth wall or defamiliarizing their audience.

This causes the source, whether it is television, movies or books to recognize itself as what it is, and for the audience to also realize that they are indeed only an audience and are not actually a part of what they are witnessing. Meta-textual sources do not offer the experience in which one gets lost in what they are watching or reading, instead it causes the audience to do the opposite and remember exactly what it is that they are doing.

This paper will reflect some of these meta-textual ideas by giving examples of ways these ideas can be portrayed. I loved the close nit family that they shared and when watching it nearly every night on television after school, I began to feel a part of it as well. Those girls were my sisters and the experiences they went through seemed to always be exactly what I was feeling as well. Sitting in the middle of my living room floor I would be completely engrossed in what was happening on TV that I would not even remember where I actually was.

The final episode was tragic because it seemed like my family was leaving me forever; however, that alone was not enough but the editor of the series probably made the biggest mistake it ever could. Once the episode was over, without any commercial interruptions, the cast lined up across the kitchen floor and took a bow and I heard the roar of an audience. The camera paneled up, through the fourth wall of the set and showed me what I never knew had existed, because there, giving a standing ovation, were tons of fans of the show watching as the cast took their final bow.

Not once in any episode had I ever wondered why I had never seen that fourth wall of the kitchen, bedroom, living room or garage, instead it seemed like I was actually there in the midst of it all with the fourth wall behind me. Finding out that Full House was actually a television show and that Michelle, Stephanie and DJ were all actors and were not related to each other or me in any way completely broke my heart, and I still have not forgotten that feeling to this day.

Breaking the fourth wall completely ruins the feeling of getting lost in the episode, and takes away all closeness the audience ever shared with the cast. In the movie Monty-Python and the Holy Grail, the cast chooses to act without the use of many props, or the ones that you would typically expect, and also the plot and scene location is oddly chosen; yet, the movie gives off the appearance that all of this is taking place during medieval times.

The main character is acting as if he is the King, and goes throughout the countryside, not on horseback but followed by his sidekick with clinking coconuts, claiming that he needs to find the Holy Grail. Watching throughout the entire movie the audience is thinking that they have been taken back in time, until the very end when cop cars pull up to the actors, get out and start arresting them. The director closes the scene and all of the extra characters in the background take a knee and rest while the cops are asking what is going on.

The main character claims that they are just filming a movie, however the cops still shut down their attempts anyway. This is a prime example of a movie being self-referential because it dedicated an entire scene to show the audience that they are not back in medieval times, but are actually in the rural countryside of modern day Europe. The first scary movie that I ever saw was Scream when I was about eleven years old. I had never been more terrified in my life, and the first time I saw little through cracked fingers over my face. But as I continued to watch it, literally over ten times, and as the sequels came out they became my favorite and always promised a good scare.

Then during the first few years of high school, stupid comedies began to be the biggest blockbuster hits and with these came the release of Scary Movie. At first it did not seem appealing to me, but eventually I was dragged by one of my friends and this comedy brought about an entire new meaning to my favorite scary movie series.

The Best Books Of 2018 We Can't Wait To Read This Year

Seeing that goofy looking scream mask with the tongue sticking out, and watching the horrible acting of a girl running from the killer completely defamiliarized me to the movies that I loved most. I wish I had never seen those movies because then I would still be able to sit down and watch them and get a good scare every now and then. If one knows that what they are going to be seeing is funny, fictional and is established in order to provide them with a good laugh, then I feel that meta-textual sources are capable of providing great entertainment for the people that experience it.

The book does have an emotionally powerful story that shows a tree sacrificing itself over the years to make the boy happy. In many ways the tree is like the boys mother, who would sacrifice anything for their child just to bring them happiness. The tree having human qualities, such as speech and the ability to feel emotions, gives the book a fantasy aspect which is one of the common assumptions found by Nodelman. The tree being represented as a mother figure is used to challenge many of the common assumptions. The tree starts out loving the boy for no apparent reason besides he is there like a mother would love a newborn baby.

As a child the boy plays all the time with the tree and as he grows up he begins to only come to the tree when he wants something. The tree acts as an old woman being visited by her son in a retirement home, asking the boy to spend time with it by climbing up the trunk and swinging from the vines, only to have him wanting material objects. Instead of money and the old family house, the boy takes the trees precious apples and the majority of the trees body to build a house and a boat.

The ending is bittersweet for the tree which gets what it wanted all along, to just be with the boy, but the tree has been reduced to an old stump because of him. The tree is like an old woman who sacrificed her medication money for their son and is dying because of it, but still feels happiness to have that same son come and visit them. The ambiguous ending does challenge the assumption of teaching valuable lessons about life in a fun way.

I am very tired. The image of the only human character in the book being shown right before death is definitely not a typical happily ever after ending. The two characters in The Giving Tree rely on each for different things. The Tree relies on the boy for his happiness and company, while the Boy relies on the Tree for the different objects it can provide him. The two are on common grounds at the end when the only thing the Tree can offer the boy is a seat and its company, and all the boy wants is a place to sit.

The Boy does love the tree, but smiles while carving his name into the tree which would hurt a living emotional creature such as the tree. The trees desperation for love seems rather pathetic as it willing gives up its body to him, also the fact that everything it gives up was its own idea and not the Boys adds to her desperation. A positive role model would be confident and show dignity, which are two qualities that neither of these characters posses.

At the start of the story when the Boy is actually a boy, he seems like more of a role model possessing innocent qualities much like the children reading the book would contain.


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The child innocence the boy possessed is the only stage of the Boys life any child could truly understand. The desires for a wife and a home are things which children never desire. But they are aware of these things from interacting with the adults in their life, just not able to fully comprehend the need for such grown up things. A child could most likely understand the Tree and its need to make the Boy happy since many children would do anything to make their parents happy.

One of the most disturbing ways that the Tree tries to make the boy happy is when it tells him to cut it down so he can make a boat out of it. This leaves the tree as nothing more but a stump, which is what is left of a tree after it was chopped down and killed. This makes the image of the Boy carrying away the tree seem frightening because its true that the branches and the apples could be seen as part of its body but taking away its trunk seems like taking away its whole body, leaving its soul in the stump. So, cutting the tree down is the emotional equivalent of cutting a character in half and could be a frightening image to many children.

The theme is evident in the story and should be realized by most children after multiple readings and talks with their parents. When I was little, there was no public library where I lived. A service was started when I was five years old called The Bookmobile that would come to our county every three weeks. It would park at specific sights and people could come and check out books or read magazines. To this day, I vividly remember the first book I ever checked out—Dr.

I was absolutely fascinated by the book. I remember how shiny and new it was compared to the Bible story books and fairy tale books that I had, and how it was filled with wild and wacky looking creatures. I read it over and over and tried my best to see how fast and far I could read the different sections without taking a breath.

I like green eggs and ham! However, if you were searching for a book that reinforced the typical case prototype which Perry Nodelman wrote about, then this book could be the poster child for this type of book. In this book, if you count the hyphenated name of the character Sam-I-Am, there are only two words in the entire book that are larger than five letters long. The other word is anywhere, which like Sam-I-Am, can be separated into words of less than five letters. Not only the words are simple, but the illustrations are simple, being a few steps above a line drawing.

The creatures are extremely imaginative, but even though they are fantastic, they are not in any way threatening, for threatening and scary creatures are a no-no in the typical case prototype. I could not, would not, with a fox. It also reinforces the assumptions that children have short attention spans and learning must be made fun. For instance, while the book itself is fairly long for a picture book, most of the pages contain little text. Also the rhyming, rhythmic nature of the words encourages young readers to make a game of the rhymes, just as I did as a child.

Green Eggs and Ham also supports the contention that books should teach a lesson or moral. This lesson is also not given as a directive that should be obeyed without question. And you may like them. It is also very adult centered in that the book has a happy ending. This friendship is evidenced by a change in attitude and body language, and most obviously by his putting his arm around Sam-I-Am at the end of the book It does deviate, however, from the traditional child and adult roles in some ways. One way it does this is in the characteristics of the two main characters. The larger character is also childlike because of his very stubbornness, which in the assumptions Nodelman wrote about could be considered the opposite of maturity and adulthood.

It is possible this role reversal was done as a devise to stress how unreasonable it is to act in this way. Being stubborn and unreasonable is the opposite of how an adult would act, so therefore this type of behavior is shown to be even more undesirable and incorrect and children should strive to behave like Sam-I-Am. While this book is in most ways a typical case prototype, this is not necessarily a bad thing. Every child is different, with different reading levels, interests, and levels of maturity. To say that only one style of book is good for children and should be read by children is to limit them and possibly foster bad connotations with reading.

I know that this is not what Nodelman is advocating; rather he is attempting to point out that there is a lack of logic and consistency in these assumptions. I loved this book as a child and still love it now. Green Eggs and Ham gave me an opportunity to play with and enjoy reading at a level I was comfortable with at that time. It also encouraged me to try and make up my own rhymes and fantastic creatures. I know that I loved this book as a child and I still love it now. All of my boys loved it and my ten year old still takes it out sometimes just to have the fun of reading, listening, or playing with the rhymes.

But the Lemony Snicket books clearly do not hold the listed assumptions as truth, instead presenting the strong, smart Baudelaire children to prove each generalization false. It opens with a death, features the children in uncomfortable and miserable situations, and describes only darkness and pain. The characters are not what one would expect either. Violet is a fourteen-year-old inventor, Klaus is twelve and a brilliant reader, and even the infant Sunny is very bright but has trouble saying what she means with only baby-talk.

Adult characters are either evil geniuses or bumbling fools who refuse to take the orphans seriously. The Baudelaire orphans cannot turn to a trusted adult for help in their hardships; they must rely on their own intellect and cunning to save themselves. Indeed, it is the adults that they are most often fighting against.

This is also quite uncommon. Similiar to our list of Fiction Books to Read in a Lifetime , this list of 50 non-fiction books contains recommendations you might actually read if you haven't already. This curated list covers the gamut of non-fiction, from compelling war stories to key feminist texts, to unbelievable struggles for survival, to tales of life in the culinary trade. You may not completely agree with our recommendations, there are surely key titles missing, so please share your recommendations for essential non-fiction books everyone should read.

Was there a beginning of time? Could time run backwards? These are just some of the questions considered in an internationally acclaimed masterpiece by one of the world's greatest thinkers. Captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right. On November 15, , in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. Generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier.

On August 6, , Hiroshima was destroyed by the first atom bomb ever dropped on a city. This book, John Hersey's journalistic masterpiece, tells what happened on that day. Helen Macdonald's story of adopting and raising one of nature's most vicious predators has soared into the hearts of millions of readers worldwide. Oliver Sacks recounts the stories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. In this book, the author of Seven Gothic Tales gives a true account of her life on her plantation in Kenya.

A first-hand account one of the defining outrages of modern history, an unforgettable anatomy of Rwanda's decimation. As riveting as it is moving, it is a profound reckoning with humanity's betrayal and its perseverance. Hordes of bloodthirsty wolves are slaughtering the arctic caribou, and the government's Wildlife Service assigns naturalist Farely Mowat to investigate.

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank's remarkable diary has become a world classic - a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. The bestselling classic that redefined our view of the relationship between beauty and female identity. The harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton's attempt to reach the South Pole, one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age. In America, it is soccer. But in Great Britain, it is the real football.

No pads, no prayers, no prisoners. And that's before the players even take the field. A terrifying account of the Nazi death camp horror that turns a young Jewish boy into an agonized witness to the death of his family, the death of his innocence, and the death of his God. A unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century, one rooted in inclusion and awareness. On October 12, , a plane carrying a team of young rugby players crashed into the remote, snow-peaked Andes. Out of the forty-five original passengers and crew, only sixteen made it off the mountain alive.

Lorna Sage delivers the tragicomic memoir of her escape from a claustrophobic childhood in post-WWII Britain - and the story of the weddings and relationships that defined three generations of her family.

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Written to inspire courage in those daunted by wartimes shortages, How to Cook a Wolf continues to rally cooks during times of plenty, reminding them that providing sustenance requires more than putting food on the table. A Moveable Feast brilliantly evokes the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the unbridled creativity and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized. Each ending leaving you begging for more, hooking your interest.

Once you start this book, be prepared not to put it down. They are action packed till the end and will have you on the edge of your seat. This book is no different. Overall this book is an excellent start to the new series. It is a steady paced, erotic thriller that will have you on the edge of your seat.

The story is challenging and the characters are dark and intriguing. Jan 14, Patricia Rohrs words we love by blog rated it it was amazing. Rue and Dryas are at constant odds with one another but every so often each allows a little emotion to show and its through those brief moments that you feel the depths of their souls! The strength that Rue has keeps Dryas coming for more but even though she can stand her ground with him she has others that know how to play her emotions and bring her down!

Dryas is too learning her weaknesses and trying to use them to get her to bend to his will! Both are lost, and both have felt a pain that goes beyond the flesh! The demons that they carry will either make them stronger or turn them both to dust! This is book 2 and follows Provoke prequel! Jan 15, Bibliophile Chloe rated it really liked it. The suave Aetos brother, Dryas is coming to grips on what he has done to his brother and in also stealing Rue from the church.

The sheltered Rue, or was she as sheltered as Dryas thought? She is so naive in some things and too worldly in others. This is an exciting instalment in this series! Well done! Jan 22, Karin rated it it was amazing.

This story starts where the prequel ended and omg am I dying!!! This might be my new favorite series if it continues in this direction of epicness. Jan 15, Anna rated it it was amazing. The cliffhanger queen strikes again Olivia is killing me with these cliffhangers! Dryas has told Rue he will have her innocence, but she will give it to him willingly. They are isolated at a seaside castle. Dryas veers between disarming her, deprogramming the years with the church, and scaring her. He is convinced he will be getting her virginity. Unbeknownst to him, Rue was befouled by the evil Father Derrick.

Their time in the castle is almost idyllic.

belgacar.com/components/map21.php He works The cliffhanger queen strikes again He works his way under Rue's skin. Into her mind. But you know it's not going to be smooth sailing. They both have issues and damage because of the Father. And those issues appear when least expected. I received a review copy. I am voluntarily leaving an honest review. Rue is a naive and sheltered young woman who has lived in the convent with her sister for the past eight years.

Horrible things happen behind the closed doors of the convent, especially Father Derricks. When Rue overhears Father Derrick and Prince Henrick discussing that she is not only heir to King Rebel but that her fate is sealed after the marriage, she decides to run. She ends up running straight into the arms of her kidnapper. Dryas is guilt ridden over the loss of his young love and his bro Rue is a naive and sheltered young woman who has lived in the convent with her sister for the past eight years. Dryas is guilt ridden over the loss of his young love and his brother. He's a lost and tortured soul seeking revenge against Father Derrick.

Therefore, he must take someone who means something to Father Derrick. Dryas always gets what he wants. Punish is dark, edgy and a little twisted. There is a push and pull connection between Rue and Dryas. Rue cannot reveal her secret. A great introduction to the Protect Series.

Can't wait for Possess 2. There is a cliffy but so worth the wait.

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Jan 22, Missy Brown rated it it was amazing. What another amazing read by Olivia Ryann. She is so good at writing dark romances that will have you coming back for more. Lots of emotions for me in this one, I was frustrated with Rue and Dryas, it was driving me crazy yet, so freaking amazing this story. And that ending, so beware, there is a cliffhanger. So much happens here, Rue escapes from father Derrik, but then Dryas gets her.

He has a card up his sleeve to make sure she minds him, her sister. She is just a pawn in Dryas game to get rev What another amazing read by Olivia Ryann. She is just a pawn in Dryas game to get revenge over Father Derrik. If you want to know why, read ahead! There are lots of questions to be asked when you are done reading Punish. Will she get a happy ending, is it even possible? Does Dryas really have feelings for her or is this just a game!! She hooked me in from the first word on this one. This is the second book in the Protect Series.

It connects with the Cherish series, though you don't need to read that one to make sense of this one though I would since its amazing. I was intrigued by Dryas from the first book, what makes him tick, what drives him? Whats with his hatred for his brother? Unfortunately, this book gives few answers and poses ALOT more questions, though my faith is in this author, she gave us answers when we Wow! Unfortunately, this book gives few answers and poses ALOT more questions, though my faith is in this author, she gave us answers when we waited patiently last time, she'll do it again.

Rue was sweet, trusting, new? I need to get more of a feel for her, but I can see how even cold bitter Dryas would want to save her and protect her. I'm so excited for these two, together they scorch the pages and next month can't get here soon enough as I eagerly await their next chapters! Jan 14, E Loprete rated it it was amazing. I am voluntarily reviewing this book. Olivia Ryann has done it again, Punish book 2 is a dark, edgy, thrilling story filled with twists and turns, lies, murder and betrayals.

This installment will leave you anxious from beginning to end. All I can say is that my heart was beating with every page that I read wondering what is going to happen next to these amazing characters. Rue has been taken by Dryas while fleeing from Father Derrik and now is his prisoner.

Will he be able to get his rev I am voluntarily reviewing this book. Will he be able to get his revenge on the one man that has destroyed him and turned him into the devil that has controlled him all these years? Rue and Dryas are each trying to overcome the demons that haunt them while fighting their feelings for each other.

Will Dryas learn of her secrets in time? Neither knows what is coming next for them as once again Rue disappears and now we are left with more questions of who saves who. This is one book you will not want to end and is a must read. Can't wait for Possess. I was given the chance to read an advanced readers copy for an honest review. This storyline has so much potential, sadly for me it just is not one that I will continue with. I guess when I decided to read this and it says a dark mafia read I expect to read a story that includes some kind of mafia.

Now don't get me wrong this is a dark read with some of the things that the characters have been through especially the heroine. Dryas is dark and mysterious and is very up front about who he is and what he wants. He is still very angry by the death of his first love and is determined to get revenge on those he holds responsible. He sets out to do just that where Rue is concerned. Rue finds out in Provoke she is to marry Prince Henrick. She overhears something she isn't supposed to and decides she is going to try and save herself.

The complexity of the characters is really well written. You have a dark, broody, black knight in shinning armor who does have issues all wrapped up in a tiny bow. You bring the two of them together and they go together like oil and water. Will they be able to coexist or will their inner turmoil keep them apart?

Jan 15, Jackie D rated it it was amazing. Just when I think I've got Olivia Ryann's torrential torment all figured out, I read Punish, and it's back to the drawing board for me cursing her and her evil plot twisty, hot and oh so suspenseful ways! Talk about hooking me from page one!

Surprises around every turn- including how Dyras and Rue are! The not so well thought out plan, the multitude of secrets and their layers, the heat, the pure evil lurking, innocence, darkness, and shades of grey, and the confusion. It all wraps itself around a Just when I think I've got Olivia Ryann's torrential torment all figured out, I read Punish, and it's back to the drawing board for me cursing her and her evil plot twisty, hot and oh so suspenseful ways! It all wraps itself around a captivating, spine-tingling story that has me tied up in knots.

A fierce tale with a beast of cliffy, I cannot wait for Possess! Jan 15, Kira Assad rated it it was amazing. Dryas and Rue's story pulls you right in and doesn't let go! Not only is it hot, but the characters are so fascinating to read about. My heart goes out to both characters who have suffered greatly in very different ways. Dryas has lost his love, taken by a deplorable man who hides behind the cloth, and then there is Rue who has lost almost everything that she has to the same man.

Although Dryas takes Rue for revenge, they both find comfort with each other through the losses they have both experi Dryas and Rue's story pulls you right in and doesn't let go! Although Dryas takes Rue for revenge, they both find comfort with each other through the losses they have both experienced. I am so excited for more of this series, especially since book 2 ends in a cliffhanger that has me clinging to the edge of my seat to know what happens next. Jan 16, Lofty rated it really liked it.

After escaping before her wedding she was captured by Dryas Aetos. More secrets to be uncovered.